Clouds expected at these solar eclipse hot spots

Clouds expected at these solar eclipse hot spots

Clouds expected at these solar eclipse hot spots

Niagara Falls is widely considered one of the best watch spots in the eclipse’s 15-state path and already has an estimated 1 million people planning to flock to the Buffalo area. On average, the city sees 14 million visitors per year.

The famous falls have been listed by National Geographic as one of the best places to see the eclipse – a phenomenon not seen in the area since 1979.

The city is within the path where the moon will entirely block the sun for a few minutes.

The pull to the region for stargazers was so intense that last month Canada preemptively declared a state of emergency to prepare for the influx of visitors on its side of the falls.

The declaration will allow the Ontario city — also called Niagara Falls — to execute additional planning to help prepare for traffic jams, cell phone network overloads, a higher need for emergency services, and more.

At the time, Niagara Regional Chair Jim Bradley admitted the state of emergency was declared “out of an abundance of caution” — with some backlash from advocacy groups about the move.

The Canadian Constitution Foundation (CCF) filed a notice of application for a judicial review of the declaration this week and called on Ontario Premier Doug Ford to intervene.

Niagara Falls is widely considered one of the best watch spots in the eclipse’s 15-state path.
Niagara Falls is widely considered one of the best watch spots in the eclipse’s 15-state path.

“The CCF is deeply concerned about the proliferation of declarations of emergency in situations where no genuine emergencies exist,” the group said in a statement to Global News.

The state of emergency remains in place for the time being.

Meanwhile, in Erie, hotels are nearly sold out and rooms still available are being hocked for a hefty $1,000 a night as close to 200,000 people descend on the region.

Mayor Joe Schember told the Post Gazette it’s “the most people we’ve ever had at an event in Erie.”

While cash is expected to rain down on the community — with revenue estimated to reach up to $50 million — the hundreds of thousands of visitors may be faced with a different deluge with predictions pointing to woeful weather.

Despite the expectation of clouds and rains in the region, officials told the Post Gazette there will still be plenty to do.

“You’re still going to experience the total darkness, drop in temperature, the nocturnal animals starting to stir,” John Oliver, VisitErie president, told the publication.

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